General Chemistry

This is a set of practice problems to help master the concept of limiting reactant which is critical in calculating the amount of product that can be obtained in a chemical reaction.

Remember, if the reactants are not in stoichiometric ratio, one of them is the limiting reactant (LR), and the other is in excess.

When solving problems involving a limiting reactant, keep in mind that we cannot look at the moles of the reactants and determine which one is the limiting reactant. The limiting reactant is the one that produces less product and not necessarily the one that is present in fewer amounts.

The correct approach is to calculate the moles of both reactants and, using molar conversions, determine which one produces less product.

 

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Practice

1.

Which statement about limiting reactant is correct?

a) The limiting reactant is the one in a smaller quantity.

b) The limiting reactant is the one in greater quantity.

c) The limiting reactant is the one producing less product.

d) The limiting reactant is the one producing more product.

answer
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2.

Find the limiting reactant for each initial amount of reactants.

4NH3 + 5O2 → 4NO + 6H2O

a) 2 mol of NH3 and 2 mol of O2

b) 2 mol of NHand 3 mol of O2

c) 3 mol of NH3 and 3 mol of O2

d) 3 mol of NH3 and 2 mol of O2

Note: This is not a multiple-choice question. Each row represents a separate question where you need to determine the limiting reactant.

 

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3.

How many g of hydrogen are leftover in producing ammonia when 14.0 g of nitrogen is reacted with 8.0 g of hydrogen?

N2(g) + 3 H2(g) → 2 NH3(g)

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4.

When 140.0 g of AgNO3 was added to an aqueous solution of NaCl, 86.0 g of AgCl was collected as a white precipitate. Which salt was the limiting reactant in this reaction? How many grams of NaCl were present in the solution?

AgNO3(aq) + NaCl(aq) → AgCl(s) + NaNO3(aq)

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5.

How many grams of precipitate will be formed when 37.3 g KCl is reacted with 132.5 g Pb(NO3)2 according to the following chemical equation? 

2 KCl(aq) + Pb(NO3)2(aq) → PbCl2(s) + 2 KNO3(aq)

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6.

How many grams of PClwill be produced if 38.5 g Clis reacted with 56.4 g P4 according to the following equation?

6Cl2(g) + P4(s) → 4PCl3(l)

 

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7.

How many grams of sulfur can be obtained if 12.6 g H2S is reacted with 14.6 g SO2 according to the following equation?

2H2S(g) + SO2(g) → 3S(s) + 2H2O(g)

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8.

The following equation represents the combustion of octane, C8H18, a component of gasoline:

2C8H18(g) + 25O2(g) → 16CO2(g) + 18H2O(g)

Will 356 g of oxygen be enough for the complete combustion of 954 g of octane?

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9.

Consider the reaction between MnO2 and HCl:

MnO2 + 4HCl → MnCl2 + Cl2 + 2H2O

What is the theoretical yield of MnCl2 in grams when 165 g of MnO2 is added to a solution containing 94.2 g of HCl?

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